Abstract

Background - Amotosalen treatment of plasma and cryopreservation of platelets affect the quality and potentially the interplay between platelets and coagulation factors. We set up an experimental clot formation study to test the hypothesis that amotosalen treatment of plasma affects the interaction with different platelet preparations.
Materials and methods - Pooled plasma units (n=16) were subjected to coagulation tests before and after pathogen inactivation with amotosalen treatment (PI) and aliquots were frozen at −80°C. Fresh and cryopreserved platelets were analyzed for phenotypic and activity markers. Finally, coagulation properties of different combinations of platelets and plasma, before and after PI, were analyzed by viscoelastography (ROTEM).
Results – PI of plasma reduced the concentration of several coagulation factors (p<0.01). Cryopreservation altered phenotypic expression and reduced the platelets’ ability to respond to agonists (p<0.0001). The interplay between all plasma derivatives and cryopreserved platelets resulted in shortened coagulation time (p<0.0001) but prolonged clot formation time and reduced clot strength (p<0.0001) as compared to the interaction between fresh platelets with different plasma variants. PI of the plasma does not seem to have a major impact on coagulation time, clot formation time or clot strength.
Discussion - Our data show that the reduced concentration of coagulation factors after PI treatment of plasma are negligible measured by viscoelastography, with fresh and cryopreserved platelets in this experimental clot formation setup, and that platelets play a more pronounced role. Cryopreserved platelets are more activated and result in reduced clot stability.

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Authors

Per Sandgren - Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine (KITM), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institute Stockholm, Sweden

Kristina Ehn - Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine (KITM), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institute Stockholm, Sweden

Linda Larsson - Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine (KITM), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institute Stockholm, Sweden

Michael Uhlin - Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine (KITM), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institute Stockholm, Sweden

Agneta Wikman - Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine (KITM), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institute Stockholm, Sweden

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