Original article

Blood Transfusion - 2 2022 (March-April)

Relationship between allergic sensitisation-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms and allergic transfusion reactions and febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions in paediatric cases

Authors

Key words: ATR, children, FNHTR, polymorphism, SNP
Publication Date: 2021-02-03

Abstract

Background - Allergic transfusion reactions (ATR) and febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR) are common transfusion-related adverse reactions; however, their pathogenesis remains unclear and it is difficult to predict their occurrence. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are related to the onset of various diseases and therapy-related adverse events; therefore, identification of SNP related to transfusion-related adverse reactions may help to elucidate the underlying mechanism and predict the onset of these reactions.
Materials and methods - We retrospectively analysed the association between the onset of ATR or FNHTR and 22 allergic sensitisation-related SNP in 219 children (aged ≤20 years) who had haematological and oncological diseases and who had received transfusions of platelets and/or red blood cell concentrates.
Results - Among the 219 children, 105 had developed an ATR and/or FNHTR at least once. The patients who developed ATR frequently had a risk allele in rs6473223, while the patients who developed FNHTR frequently had a risk allele in rs10893845. Furthermore, patients who developed ATR accompanied by febrile symptoms also frequently had a risk allele in rs10893845, similar to patients who developed FNHTR.
Discussion - The results suggested that allergic sensitisation is associated with the onset of ATR and/or FNHTR in some patients. Although further prospective evaluation is necessary, analysis of these SNP might help to provide safer transfusion therapy by predicting patients at higher risk of transfusion-related adverse reactions and further clarifying the pathogenic mechanism underlying such reactions.

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Authors

Yuichiro Ide - Department of Laboratory Medicine, Shinshu University Hospital, Matsumoto, Japan; Life Science Research Centre, Nagano Children’s Hospital, Azumino, Japan

Ryu Yanagisawa - Life Science Research Centre, Nagano Children’s Hospital, Azumino, Japan; Division of Blood Transfusion, Shinshu University Hospital, Matsumoto, Japan; Centre for Advanced Cell Therapy, Shinshu University Hospital, Matsumoto, Japan

Jun Kobayashi - Department of Laboratory Medicine, Nagano Children’s Hospital, Azumino, Japan

Kazutoshi Komori - Department of Haematology and Oncology, Nagano Children’s Hospital, Azumino, Japan

Kazuyuki Matsuda - Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Japan

Yuji Amano - Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan

Yozo Nakazawa - Department of Paediatrics, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan

Toshikazu Takeshita - Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan

Kazuo Sakashita - Department of Haematology and Oncology, Nagano Children’s Hospital, Azumino, Japan

Minoru Tozuka - Life Science Research Centre, Nagano Children’s Hospital, Azumino, Japan; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Nagano Children’s Hospital, Azumino, Japan

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