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Aims and Scopes

Aims and Scopes

Blood Transfusion is a quarterly Journal founded in 1956 by the Italian Society of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohaematology (Società Italiana di Medicina Trasfusionale e Immunoematologia, SIMTI).

It is the official journal of SIMTI, Italian Association of Haemophilia Centres (Associazione Italiana dei Centri Emofilia, AICE), Croatian Society of Haematology and Transfusion Medicine (Hrvatsko društvo za hematologiju i transfuzijsku medicinu, HDHTM), and Spanish Society of Blood Transfusion and Cellular Therapy (Sociedad Española de Transfusión Sanguinea y Terapia Celular, SETS).

The journal also has two Affiliated Societies: Portuguese Association of Immuno-Haemotherapy (Associação Portuguesa de Imuno-Hemoterapia, APIH) and Hellenic Society of Blood Transfusion (HSBT).

It publishes Editorials, Reviews, State-of-the-Art Reports, Original Articles, Brief Reports, Case Reports, Letters to the Editor, Book Reviews, Forums and Debates on all topics related to Transfusion Medicine, e.g.: transfusion clinical practice, immunohaematology, blood component collection and production, transfusion-transmissible diseases, immunogenetics, histocompatibility, transplantation, haemostasis, medical-legal correlations, biotechnology and connected molecular biology.

Blood Transfusion is published in English only. Proceedings of Congresses and Meetings may be published in the original language. Authors' opinions may not necessarily reflect those of SIMTI and other Affiliated Societies or Editorial Board of Blood Transfusion.

Blood Transfusion is an Open Access Publication, as the Editorial Board and all the Affiliated Scientific Societies believe that works reporting the results of scientific research should be openly accessible and freely usable by the entire scientific community.

 

Manuscript submission

All manuscripts must be submitted online. Manuscripts submitted via fax or by e-mail will not be considered.

We inform that Blood Transfusion website is optimised for IExplorer and FireFox. In any case, if you cannot submit online please contact the Editorial Office (editorialoffice@bloodtransfusion.it).

For any information about manuscript composition, Authors should refer to papers previously published in Blood Transfusion or contact the Editorial Office. Useful guidelines are given at the site www.icmje.org and you can refer to our Review "How to write a scientific manuscript for publication" by Liumbruno GM et al. (http://www.bloodtransfusion.it/articolo.aspx?idart=002471).  

Once an article has been submitted, the corresponding author will receive an e-mail indicating the submission number.

Please make sure that you cite your submission number in all correspondence with the Editor or Editorial Office. If the editing style does not comply with the instructions published in Blood Transfusion, the Author will be notified and asked to revise the paper before it is sent out for peer-review.

Editorials, Reviews and State-of-Art Reports are usually solicited by the Journal Board and are subject to peer-review. Unsolicited Review Articles may be submitted. Authors who wish to submit reviews to the journal are requested to submit a short synopsis of their chosen subject to the Editor-in-Chief, and to indicate the deadline by which they expect to submit their final manuscript, which, however, will be peer-reviewed after submission.

 

Copyright

Authors will grant copyright of their manuscript to SIMTI Servizi Srl. No formal permission will be required to reproduce parts (tables or illustrations) of published papers, provided the source is quoted appropriately and reproduction has no commercial intent. Reproductions with commercial intent will require written permission and payment of royalties. Please contact the office for requests: editorialoffice@bloodtransfusion.it.

 

Peer review

All submissions are subject to peer-review by at least two experts selected by the Editor-in-Chief and the Associate Editors.

The review process takes about 6 weeks, and most manuscripts require revision before final acceptance.

Each paper is first evaluated by one or more editors, who will assess the overall quality and novelty of the work and the article's appropriateness for the scope of Blood Transfusion. Articles that are not found to be relevant or doesn't reach sufficient priority for Blood Transfusion will not be sent out for external review and will be returned to the authors. The remaining articles are reviewed by external referees (second step of classical peer-review).

The referees' comments are returned to the Authors, who may be asked to revise their submission. Authors who resubmit a revised version must log in again into the Blood Transfusion website and replace the file of the manuscript according to the referees' criticism and the e-mail received. Authors who do not agree with the referees' criticism must clearly state their reasons. It is up to the Editors to accept such reasons.

A copy of the manuscript with highlighted changes in the text is required in order to help speed the review process. Revised papers are reviewed by the original referees, unless the Editor-in-Chief or the Associate Editor opts for an immediate decision. Acceptance of a revised paper is not granted but contingent on the acceptability of the changes made in compliance with the referees' criticisms.

The final decision on a paper's acceptability for publication is made by the Editor-in-Chief on the basis of the comments of an Associate Editor and the referees.

 

Clinical trials, systematic reviews and observational studies

Blood Transfusion prioritises reports of original research that are likely to change clinical practice or thinking about a disease.

Obligation to register clinical trials. Blood Transfusion, according to the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), believes that it is important to foster a comprehensive, publicly available database of clinical trials. As ICMJE, Blood Transfusion defines a clinical trial as any research project that prospectively assigns human subjects to intervention or concurrent comparison or control groups to study the cause-and-effect relationship between a medical intervention and a health outcome. Medical interventions include drugs, surgical procedures, devices, behavioral treatments, process-of-care changes, and the like.

Blood Transfusion requires, as a condition of consideration for publication, registration in a public trials registry. The journal does not advocate one particular registry, but requires authors to register their trial in a registry that meets several criteria. The registry must be accessible to the public at no charge. It must be open to all prospective registrants and managed by a not-for-profit organisation. There must be a mechanism to ensure the validity of the registration data, and the registry should be electronically searchable. An acceptable registry must include a minimum of data elements. Blood Transfusion accepts registration in the following registries: www.anzctr.org.au, www.clinicaltrials.gov, www.ISRCTN.org, www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index/htm, www.trialregister.nl, https://eudract.ema.europa.eu/. In addition to these registries, Blood Transfusion also accepts registration in any of the primary registries that participate in the WHO International Clinical Trials Portal (see http://www.who.int/ictrp/network/primary/en/index.html). Because it is critical that trial registries are independent of for-profit interests, Blood Transfusion policy requires registration in a WHO primary registry rather than solely in an associate registry, since for-profit entities manage some associate registries. The details of the ICMJE policy are reported at http://www.icmje.org/faq_clinical.html.

Randomised clinical trials. Reports of randomised trials must conform to CONSORT 2010 guidelines, and should be submitted with their protocols. All reports of randomised trials should include a section entitled Randomisation and masking, within the Methods section. Meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials, should refer to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA statement) http://www.prisma-statement.org) or to the guidance document published by the Cochrane Collaboration (http://www.cochrane-handbook.org/). Documented review and approval from a formally constituted review board (Institutional Review Board - IRB - or Ethics committee) is required for all studies (prospective or retrospective) involving people, medical records, and human tissues. Blood Transfusion requires that the authors provide this information on the manuscript's website, and also that they report it explicitly under design and methods. When reporting experiments on animals, authors should be asked to indicate whether the institutional and national guide for the care and use of laboratory animals was followed.

Observational studies. Observational studies (cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional designs) must be reported according to the STROBE statement, and should be submitted with their protocols (http://www.strobe-statement.org/index.php?id=strobe-home).

 

Ethical concerns

In case of experimental/clinical reports involving patients or volunteers, the Authors must provide information about institutional, regulatory and ethical Committee authorisation, informed consent from patients and volunteers, and the observance of the latest release of the Helsinki Declaration (http://www.wma.net/en/30publications/10policies/b3/index.html).

 

How to prepare a manuscript for submission

Each manuscript must be original work never published before in any substantial part; it must be submitted solely to Blood Transfusion and should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. Meeting or Congress Abstracts and Lectures are not considered as prior publications.

If a manuscript is accepted, all copyrights, including the right to reproduce all or part of the manuscript, will be assigned exclusively to the Publisher, i.e. SIMTI Servizi Srl. The terms for copyright, authorship and financial disclosure must be accepted when submitting an article. Once accepted, at the Editor's discretion, your contribution may be published in one of the Journal issues or in a special issue supplement.

 

Language

All manuscripts must be written in English (British English).

 

Authorship declaration, Copyright release and Conflict of interest disclosure

Please accept online the terms for:

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Privacy;

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Copyright;

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Authorship;

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Financial Disclosure.

If there is any possible conflict of interest, the Author(s) should describe it fully; the text will be automatically printed in the Authorship Declaration to be signed and returned to the Editorial Office.

Examples: "NAME is collaborating with XXX industry for research in the field" or "NAME will speak about this issue in a sponsored symposium of XXX industry".

Authorship declaration, Copyright release and Conflict of Interest disclosure (declaration.pdf) are automatically e-mailed to the corresponding author upon manuscript submission and should be signed and returned to the Editorial Office by fax (+39 02 23.95.16.21) or e-mail to luisa.stea@bloodtransfusion.it. The Author who submits a paper for publication is responsible that all other Authors agree to its submission and to its content.

 

Funding and resources

Institutional, research, private or any other funds and resources, totally or partially used to carry out the original work, must be declared.

 

Types of article and manuscript requirements

 

Original articles

Be up to 4,000 words (excluding the abstract, references, tables, and illustrations).

The text must be ordered as follows:

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Abstract.

Structured in four paragraphs (Background, Material and methods, Results and Discussion), not exceeding 2.000 characters (including spaces). The abstract should be sufficiently explanatory of the whole paper and should only include text, without any citations and, possibly, any abbreviations

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Introduction

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Materials and methods

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Results

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Discussion

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Conclusion

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Acknowledgements (if any)

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Funding and resources (if any)

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Authorship contributions

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Disclosure of conflicts of interest

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References

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Tables

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Figure legends

 

No more than 6 tables/figures are allowed.

Long articles may need subheadings to clarify some sections, such as Materials and methods, Results and Discussion.

Supplemental data - to be published online only - may include additional information regarding methodology, supplemental figures or tables, or primary data sets; it must be submitted with the original manuscript submission so it can be peer reviewed.

 

Brief communication

Be up to 2,000 words (excluding references).

The text must be ordered as follows:

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Introduction

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Materials and methods

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Results

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Discussion

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Conclusion

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Acknowledgements (if any)

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Authorship contributions

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Disclosure of conflicts of interest

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References (a maximum of 20 references is allowed)

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Tables

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Figure legends

 

No more than 3 tables/figures are allowed.

 

Case reports

Be up to 1,500 words (excluding references).

The text must be ordered as follows:

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Introduction

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Case report with results

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Discussion

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Acknowledgements (if any)

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Authorship contributions

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Disclosure of conflicts of interest

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References (a maximum of 20 references is allowed)

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Tables

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Figure legends

 

No more than 3 tables/figures are allowed.

 

Review articles

Review articles are welcomed by the journal and are generally solicited by the Editor-in-Chief or the Associate Editors. Authors who wish to submit reviews to the journal are requested to submit a short synopsis of their chosen subject to the Editor-in-Chief, and to indicate the deadline by which they expect to submit their final manuscript. Review articles should focus on recent scientific or clinical advances in an area of broad interest to those in the field of Transfusion Medicine. These articles should not simply go over or summarise general information which is already known, but also discuss the importance of the data and provide a critical view on how the findings of the papers reviewed have transformed or will transform the Transfusion Medicine field. Manuscripts are not to exceed 5,000 words excluding references, tables, and illustrations. A maximum of 100 references is recommended.

All Reviews, including those solicited by the Editors, are rigorously peer reviewed before a final publication decision is made.

Any involvement of medical writers, editors, or researchers supported by the pharmaceutical industry is not acceptable for the preparation of Review Articles published in Blood Transfusion.

 

Guideline

These articles do not have a specific structure.

 

Editorials

Editorials are commentaries or opinions on specific articles or on general concepts in Transfusion Medicine. These articles are usually invited articles, but proposals are welcome and should be addressed to the editorial office. These articles have a free structure, contain about 1,500 words (excluding references). A maximum of 20 references is recommended.

 

Letters to the Editor

Be up to 1,000 words (excluding references).

Are allowed a maximum of:

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2 tables and/or figures,

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5 essential references.

 

For all manuscripts

The first page must contain:

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title of the article;

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names of Authors (full first name and surname);

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institutions;

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a running title of no more than 60 characters (including spaces);

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keywords: Original Articles, Case Reports and Reviews require 3-5 keywords to be entered into the field. Please use terms listed in the Medical Subject Headings from Index Medicus (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/MBrowser.html);

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corresponding author (full address and e-mail).

 

Files

All text elements (tables included) should be submitted in one file only.

The following file types are accepted:

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Microsoft Word (.doc and .docx);

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generic Rich Text Format (RTF).

 

Measurements

All measurements should be expressed in the International System of Units (SI). Abbreviations should be spelled out on their first use in the text (unless it is a standard abbreviation or a unit of measurement) and thereafter applied consistently throughout the manuscript. The first time any equipment, apparatus or reagent is used, the name of the manufacturer(s) (and identifying address) must be provided in parentheses.

 

Terminology

Nomenclature of red cell antigens and genes should follow the conventions outlined in Garratty, G. Dzik W, Issitt PD, et. al. Terminology for blood group antigens and genes--historical origins and guidelines in the new millennium. Transfusion 2000; 40: 477-89.

Nomenclature for factors of the HLA system should follow the convention outlined in the report by Bodmer JG et al. (Vox Sang 1999; 77: 164-91).

Granulocyte antigens should be named according to the convention described in the publication by ISBT Granulocyte Antigen Working Party (Vox Sang 1999; 77: 251, with the clarification of Lalezari in Transfusion 2002; 42: 1396-7).

Nomenclature of platelet-specific antigens should follow the conventions outlined in Metcalfe P, Watkins NA, Ouwehand WH, et al. Nomenclature of human platelet antigens. Vox Sang 2003; 85: 240-5.

 

Additional instructions for manuscripts dealing with the molecular biology of RBC's, WBC's, and platelets

1.

Use accepted nucleotide, amino acid, and allele notation and symbols as defined by the ISBT and available on the ISBT Working Party on Red Cell Immunogenetics and Terminology website. Use c. to indicate the position of the nucleotide change in the mRNA, and p. to modify the amino acid change in the protein. For example, c.574C>T, p.Arg192Trp.

2.

cDNA sequencing or full gene sequencing is required to associated a specific polymorphism with an observed phenotypic change and to define a new allele.

3.

Nucleotide(s) change(s) identified by cDNA analysis should be confirmed in genomic DNA (by sequencing, PCR-RFLP, SS-PCR).

4.

Accession numbers of new or novel sequences should be provided by depositing in an appropriate database (GenBank/EMBL).

5.

Web-based resources used (database, online computer programme, etc.) should be given along with the URL in a separate section entitled "Web resources", following the Acknowledgments. URLs should not to be included in the text as these can change. The date the URL was accessed must also be included.

 

Tables

Collected at the end of the manuscript, must have a brief title and a legend and must be numbered consecutively in the same order as they are first cited in the text, using upper case Roman numbers. All explanatory information should be placed in a legend at the bottom of the table and not in the heading. Each Table must be cited in the text.

 

Illustrations

Include figures, photographs and graphics. Each figure must be supplied as a separate file from the text file; only .jpg, .bmp, .gif and .tif formats, with a resolution of at least 300 dpi (dots per inch), maximum size 10 MB, can be used. Artwork in other format is not acceptable. Please note that images downloaded from the Internet generally have a resolution of 72 dpi only and are therefore unsuitable for conventional printing purposes. Please do not increase their resolution manually. Illustrations must be numbered progressively according to their order of appearance in the text, using Arabic numbers. Each Figure must be cited in the text. The illustration's title and a short legend, if necessary, must be entered into the field "Title/legend" (ex. "Figure 1 - Algorithm for the diagnosis of thrombocytopenias"). Please be aware that illustrations will be printed in black and white. Please do not use Microsoft Organization Chart application to create figures, graphics or tables.

 

References

Only strictly relevant references must be quoted in the reference list at the end of the manuscript. They should be numbered consecutively in the order in which they appear in the text. A reference in the text is identified as a superscripted number (without parentheses) after the text that quotes the corresponding paper listed in the reference list (e.g. blood transfusion1).

If more than one citation is required, the reference numbers in the text are separated by a comma with no space in between (e.g. blood transfusion1,3,7).

If reference numbers in the text are more than two and consecutive, only the first and the last numbers separated by a hyphen should be cited (e.g. blood transfusion1-4). In the reference list, Journal names should be abbreviated as described in Index Medicus, Medline and PubMed. Abbreviations can also be obtained from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/tsd/serials/lsiou.html website.

The names of up to four authors should be listed. If a reference has five or more authors, only the first three should be listed, followed by "et al".

Personal communications, unpublished observations, and manuscripts that have been "submitted" or are "in preparation" must be cited in the text, but not included in the reference list.

Only papers accepted for publication can be included in the reference list, even if they are not published, yet. In this case, add the DOI number.

References must be written in compliance with the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals published by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (www.icmje.org). Some examples are given below:

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Citation from a Journal article

Hess JR [without punctuation marks after the initial(s) of the first name], Hill HR, Oliver CK, et al. Alkaline CPD and the preservation of RBC 2,3-DPG. Transfusion 2002; 42 [bold-type]: 747-52.

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Citation from a Journal article published online ahead of print.

Hess JR [without punctuation marks after the initial(s) of the first name], Hill HR, Oliver CK, et al. Alkaline CPD and the preservation of RBC 2,3-DPG. Transfusion 2002; DOI xx2001-xxx10001.x.

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Citation from a Book

Issitt PD, Anstee DJ. (punctuation mark between authors and title) Applied Blood Group Serology. [title of the book in italics with the first letter of all words in capitals, except prepositions such as 'the', 'of', 'about' etc.) in capitals] 4th ed. Durham, NC: Montgomery Scientific Publications; 1998.

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Citation of a Chapter in a book

Beatty PG. The molecular revolution in histocompatibility testing: relevance to blood and marrow transplantation. In: Garratty G, editor. Application of Molecular Biology to Blood Transfusion. Bethesda, MD: American Association of Blood Banks (or AABB); 1997. p. 51-72. [If there are five or more Editors, list only the first three and add "et al."].

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Citation of an Editorial

Garratty G, Petz LD. Approaches to selecting blood for transfusion to patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia [editorial]. Transfusion 2002; 42: 1390-2.

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Citation of an Abstract

Kleinman SH, Stramer SL, Mimms L, et al. Comparison of preliminary observed yield of HCV and HIV minipool (MP) nucleic acid testing (NAT) with prediction from incidence/window period (inc/wp) model [abstract]. Transfusion 2000; 40 (Suppl 1): ABS010.

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Citation of a Paper Conference

Anderson JC. Current status of chorion villus biopsy. In: Tudenhope D, Chenoweth J, editors. Proceedings of the 4th Congress of the Australian Perinatal Society; 1986: Brisbane, Queensland: Australian Perinatal Society; 1987. p. 190-6.

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Citation of a Letter

Jimenez M, Sanz C, Alvarez A, Pereira A. Massive intravascular haemolysis in a patient with Clostridium perfrigens sepsis [letter]. Vox Sang 2002; 82, 214.

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Citation of Electronic material

A concept paper on prestorage leukocyte reduction of transfusion blood components. Food and Drug Administration. Available at: http//www.fda-gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/00/backgrd/3620b2,doc, followed by "Accessed on dd/mm/yyyy" (the date when the paper was downloaded from the website).

 

Online pre-publication

As soon as a paper is accepted, edited and corrected, it is posted online in its definitive version (.pdf format), at www.bloodtransfusion.it, before being assigned to a print issue.

Online pre-publication allows accepted articles to be visible and indexed about 6 months earlier than the print publication date. The early online date counts as the official publication date. To this purpose a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number is assigned to the online article to allow the pre-published article to be cited well before its appearance in print.

 

Galley proofs

Galley proofs are sent to the Corresponding Author for approval and corrections. They must be returned to the Editorial Office within one week. Major alterations to the text are not accepted at a proof stage. Please keep a copy of the corrected galley pages.

 

Address

Blood Transfusion publishes the corresponding Author's e-mail and full postal address in the Journal.

 

Alert service

Please note that the e-mail addresses of Author and Co-authors will be included in the Blood Transfusion free alert service, to receive e-mail notification when new articles are published.

 

Units of measurement

The International System (IS) of units of measurement must be adopted, using prefixes and symbols as follows:

 

Prefix

Factor

Symbol

xa

1018

E

peta

1015

P

tera

1012

T

giga

109

G

mega

106

M

kilo

103

k

hecto

102

h

deka

101

da

deci

10-1

d

centi

10-2

c

milli

10-3

m

micro

10-6

µ

nano

10-9

n

pico

10-12

p

femto

10-15

f

atto

10-18

a

 

Concentration units

 

 

molar

M

 normal

 N

mole

mol

 molality

 molal

Length units

 

 

micrometre

µm

 metre

 m

ångström

Å

 nanometre

 nm

Volume units

 

 

litre

L

 decilitre

 dL

millilitre

mL

 microlitre

 µL

Mass units

 

 

 

kilogram

kg

 gram

 g

decigram

dg

 microgram

 µg

Time units

 

 

 

second

s

 week

 week

day

day

 hour

 h

minute

min

 month

 month

Electric current units

ampere

A

 ohm

Ω

volt

V

 watt

 W

Statistical terms

Analysis of variance

ANOVA

 probability

 p

not tested

NT

 correlation coefficient

 r

coefficient of variation

CV

 standard error

 SE

not significant

NS

 degrees of freedom

 df

confidence interval

CI

 Student t test

 t-test

 

Principal abbreviations

 

2,3 BPG

2,3 biphosphoglycerate acid

2-ME

2-mercaptoethanol

5-Ht

5-hydroxytryptamine (not serotonin)

ACD-2

acid citrate dextrose-2

ADP

adenosine diphosphate

AIDS

acquired immune deficiency syndrome

ALT

alanine aminotransferase

AST

aspartase aminotransferase

BFU-E

burst-forming unit-erythroid

BMT

bone marrow transplantation

bp

base pair

BSE

bovine spongiform encephalopathy

BSA

bovine serum albumin

C

Complement

°C

degrees Celsius

CCI

correct count increment

CD 

cluster designation

CDC

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

cDNA

complementary DNA

CFU

colony-forming unit

CFU-G

colony-forming unit-granulocyte

Ci

Curie

CJD

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

CMV

cytomegalovirus

CO

cut-off

CPD

citrate phosphate dextrose

CPD-A

citrate phosphate dextrose-adenine

cpm

counts per minute

cps

counts per second

CSF

colony-stimulating factor

Da

Daltons

DAT

direct antiglobulin test

DMSO

dimethylsulphoxide

DNA

deoxyribonucleic acid

DTT

dithiothreitol

EBV

Epstein-Barr virus

EDTA

ethylenediaminetetracetate

EIA

enzyme immunoassay

ELISA

enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

Eq

equivalent

F(ab)

antigen-binding fragment

FBS

foetal bovine serum

FCS

foetal calf serum

FDA

Food and Drug Administration

FFP

fresh-frozen plasma

FITC

fluorescein isothiocyanate

G-6-PD

glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

g

force of gravity

G-CSF

granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

GP

glycoprotein

GPA

glycophorin A

GPB

glycophorin B

GPC

glycophorin C

GPD

glycophorin D

GvHD

Graft-versus-Host disease

Gy

Gray radiation(s)

HAV

hepatitis A virus

Hb

haemoglobin

HBc

hepatitis B core antigen

HBsAg

hepatitis B surface antigen

HBSS

Hanks balanced salt solution

HBV

hepatitis B virus

Hct

haematocrit

HCV

hepatitis C virus

HDN

haemolytic disease of the newborn

HES

hydroxyethyl starch

HGV

hepatitis G virus

HHV

human herpes virus

HIV-1

human immunodeficiency virus, type 1

HIV-2

human immunodeficiency virus, type 2

HLA

human leucocyte antigen(s)

HNA

human granulocyte antigen(s)

HPA

human platelet antigen(s)

HSA

human serum albumin

HPC(s)

haematopoietic progenitor cell(s)

HTLV-I

human T-lymphotropic virus, type I

HTLV-II

human T-lymphotropic virus, type II

LDH

lactate dehydrogenase

LISS

low-ionic-strength solution

MCHC

mean cell (RBC) Hb concentration

M-CSF

macrophage colony-stimulating factor

MCV

mean cell (RBC) volume

MHC

major histocompatibility complex

MNC(s)

mononuclear cell(s)

MoAb

monoclonal antibody

mRNA

messenger RNA

NA

neutrophil antigen(s)

NAT

nucleic acid amplification testing

NIH

National Institute(s) of Health

NK

natural killer (cell)

OD

optical density

OR

odds ratio

PAGE 

polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

PBS

phosphate-buffered saline

PBSC(s)

peripheral blood stem cell(s)

pCO2

partial pressure of CO2

PCR

polymerase chain reaction

PEG

polyethylene glycol

pH

negative logarithm of hydrogen ion concentration

PHA

phytohaemagglutinin A

PMN(s)

polymorphonuclear leucocyte(s)

pO2

partial pressure of O2

PrP(sc)

prion protein (scrapie)

PrP(c)

prion protein (cellular)

PVC

polyvinylchloride

QC

quality control

R

Röntgen radiation(s)

Rad

radiation absorbed dose

RBC(s)

red blood cell(s)

RFLP

restriction fragment length polymorphism

RHu

recombinant human

RIA

radioimmunoassay

RIBA

recombinant immunoblot assay

RNA

ribonucleic acid

rpm

revolutions per minute

s

sedimentation coefficient

S

Svedberg unit of sedimentation (10-13 s)

SCID

severe combined immunodeficiency

SDS

sodium dodecylsulphate

S/D

solvent/detergent

TNFα

tumour necrosis factor α

TRALI

transfusion-related acute lung injury

tRNA

transfer RNA

UTR

untranslated region

UV

ultraviolet

vCJD

variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease

VNTR

variable number of tandem repeats

vWD

von Willebrand's disease

vWF

von Willebrand factor

WBC(s)

white blood cell(s)

 

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